The Man – Cumberland Correspondence

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John Man to Geo Cumberland

About 1775/6

It is with the utmost pleasure and satisfaction dear sir that I now set down to answer your last obliging letter which I received a few day ago and would have answered soon had I had the opportunity. Since my brother has referred you to me I shall enform you of what I know concerning my father. In December 1769 I went to him at (?Knighton?) and after that I received one letter from him or I believe two but cannot say for certain at this distance of time. But whether it was one or more I can safely assert I never received any from him or have heard of him by any other means since Easter 1760. I am very certain of the time because in the last that I received I was ordered to go to him for the rent of the houses there and I think it was 1st of May that I went however I am very sure it was sometime before I came to Reading and I came hear in June that year. This is all I know of the affair and I am pretty certain none of the family have heard of him since.

If I can be of any service to your mother I beg she acquaint me in what manner and be assured I shall exert myself to the utmost to delight her. I am very glad to hear that your brother is going to Driffielde because you give me reason to hope that the road through Reading will not be much out of the way. I flatter myself I should be welcome else should not presume to offer to attend you. We are naturally fond of pleasure so it is no wonder if I catch at every opportunity that offers to gratify a passion which I inherit from my nature, if I can conveniently accommodate the journey to the beginning of our Whit Sun Holidays I shall be very happy to join you on the journey at Reading. I can then accommodate you with a bed which though none of the finest I can promise you shall be wholesome and better than travellers usually meet with at Inns. And we set off with the Sun and get to the vicarage by the time a fine little pig will be put to the spit. Since you say the west has attractive powers as well as the North I think I may be certain of seeing you in summer whether we go the journey or no therefore I shall use no arguments to persuade you to favour one with a visit which I think you have favoured on these 6 years but never yet fulfilled. But now I expect you in good earnest so take care you don’t disappoint me. When your brother was here I engaged to write to him but alas! Never thought to ask for his address whence it comes. I have not fulfilled my promise. Do you make m compliments to him and beg him to use the power of the keys (which in spite of the Pope I believe was given to him) in behalf of a poor persistent sinner who like other (?pxrittents?) is determined to transgress again until the next time. You and I George are now laymen and have nothing to do with religions dispute. We believed before Gibbons attacked our faith and I dare say were not staggered with his objections so stood in no need of Dr Watsons’ vindications. One of the Fathers [no matter which] said he believed in the Trinity because it was impossible but I believe in Christianity because it was founded by a divine power grew up and flourished in opposition to principalities and powers and by its own internal evidence has withstood the attacks of (?Deistoltsheists?) and unbelievers. Compliments to your mother & brother & C from your affectionate cousin

Jno Man

Addressed to Mr Cumberland
Secretary’s Office at the Exchange Assurance Office
London.
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Dear Sir,

The ill success of your negotiation is no reason why I should not return you my hearty thanks for the trouble you have taken in it. I should have been very happy to have had it but must do as well as I can without it. I know that the little concerns of this life will in a few years pass away like a dream but like most men I could wish to make it a Golden one. Your account of your brother is so very flattering that I confess I envy him his employments, his amusements, his studies, his everything. His is a situation for wise men to emulate for Philosophers to enjoy. I beg my love to him when you write and assure yourself of the sincere regard of your affectionate humble servant

John Man.

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John Man to Geo Cumberland

12th November 1791  Dear Sir,

After so longer silence I had given up all hopes of hearing from you when I received yours for which favour I find I am indebted to my old friend Bardello. But from whatever motive it proceeded I am equally gratified in the pleasure of hearing from you and renewing correspondence which ought never to have been interrupted had I not been bound by the leg like a bear. I had certainly made a pilgrimage to Lyndhurst in the summer but my chains are of such a nature that much fear of travelling even on foot was not invented for me. Yet if God in a reasonable time should set me on horseback my first scamper should be to your house. I long for that tete a tete you speak of for an opportunity to talk with you of things past and present and to come I am impatient to take a view over your management now you are become a family man. I should expect to see the beaten paths of unthinking men give way to the less trodden tracks of Philosophy but different from that of the proud peevish delectable Jean Jacques singularly of conduct seemed to be his Prose Star which alone he pointed his way. Drogenes roll’d himself in snow when men less wise (in his idea) were sitting comfortably by their fireside and in the same spirit of Rousseau parted with his children to the hospital never to see them more and why! Because nature has all men to cherish their off spring may such Philosophy be damned I say. I know no use of philosophy but to make us better or happier and it is of that sort I expect to find at Lyndhurst if I am ever so happy as to see you there in the meantime as the Mountain will not come to Mohamet cannot he come to the mountain. Upon a moderate computation, Reading cannot be more than 10 miles out of your way to London where you must go sometimes and I hope to have always a bed at your service and 10 months in the year you will find me at home. So come away and let me at least improve by the history of your travels. The book will I fear be of no use to you because several leaves are lost at the end. But as I cannot understand how many you want I have sent it as you desire to Mr Shelly’s with the 2 last volumes of the Tableau which are all I have of yours. If I hear anything likely to write you will give you a line but everything of this kind sells immensely dear. Your best way will be to write to Kimberley Auctioneer at Windsor. I am not acquainted with him but to judge by his advertisements in our paper he has all the Estates in the County to sell. You mention your brother in your letter else I should not have known he was still on this side of the river Styx. Not having heard of him for near two years no doubt he too is become a domestic man and perhaps may think rocking the cradle as much a diversion as travelling. However it is, I am almost coninvulated and my connections confined to my own little family. That you and yours may enjoy every blessing this side of eternity is the hearty wish of your affectionate

Jno Man

Nov 12 1791

Addressed to:
Geo Cumberland
Lyndhurst
New Forest
Hampshire.

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Eliz Cumberland to Geo Cumberland

24th November 1791

My dear child,

I received yours of 11th I am glad the parcel came safe I hope they will prove good my eyes are to bad to depend on my own judgement. I desired they should go by the wagon but there is no depending on tradesmen. I am vext with you for sending the draft so I beg you not, as I assure you I am in no want of money and I think it hard I can’t give a trifle to my children. Thank you for the Turkey it was very good indeed, my landlords dine of it with me a Sunday and we drank your health. We have had so much rain for three weeks that I have not been able to stir out till yesterday when I went to town to tell Mr Man about the Rum. He told me he had sent it by the wagon above a week ago. They have lost Mr Roberts his wife’s father, last Sunday morning suddenly in perfect health. He was a good man and that must be a comfort to them. I have sent by the Wagon a parcel the contents are sum (?Tox?) for Mrs and some fruit for puddings at Christmas which I beg you will except if. I will set down the contents of ———————————————————————— Recipe for Xmas Puddings —————————————-. Let me have a line as soon as you receive them as I wish to know the complaint in your chest. I think figs are v. good for you. I should have sent more but the new ones are not come in yet. As you are fixt for the winter I would not think of building as yet and you may ligh of a house ready built which will save you a deal of trouble. I have not had a letter from Driffield this three weeks but I hope they are all well. The greatest of pleasure I have in this world is to hear from my children. I am sure I never grudge postage. I hope you will write to me as often as convey my love to the little babes and pray give them some lines for me that God may send you a cheerful and happy Christmas is the wish of dear George.

Your affectionate mother

Eliz Cumberland  Addressed to George Cumberland
Lyndhurst
Near Southampton.

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Richard Cumberland to Geo Cumberland

10th December 1791
From 17 Albion Place

Dear Brother, ——————————————————————————————————————————————–. Next day I dined with John Man who has got into a very good house and is fitting up a cottage on Pigs Green a mile distant for his brother James. Next morning I visited Taplow ———————————————————————————————————————— I now perceive you were right in refusing to trust your money out of the Bank of England. Had you thought otherwise it might now be in the hands of the assigneers to the (?Newport?) Bank. Here am I writing between I, my aunt Man and our mother who talking over family matters. Harry has lately fallen down in the street and broken a leg but is doing well. Mr Jn Man miscarried today for the 16th time —————————————————————–.

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Geo Cumberland – Richard Cumberland

12th December 1791
From Lindhurst

Dear Brother,

Your letter from Albion Place ———————————————————————————————– it contains much news, Harry having broke his leg. You should call on him and tho I have reason to think he behaved unfriendly to me, tell him I am sorry for his accident. His sisters 16 miscarriages I don’t understand there must be some great negligence somewhere. The Rum did not miscarry and is excellent. How many children has the breeding wife bred?? I know little of him since my last tour we met in a coffee house and he did not seem too glad to see me as I thought he should so I affected to be less glad to see him than I really was for I can soon forget people who are more attracted to my affairs than myself. A thousand more or less I hope makes no impression on himself so I shall suspect his (?Pythagorean?) System to be all hypocricy. ————————————————————————————————————————————-. How did Tapp leave his affairs you ought to read his will and call on the girl if you have time. It might not be amiss to ask Mr T if Mrs T left behind you any papers of our fathers. —————————————————————————————————————————–. Addressed to Mr R D Cumberland Cross Street
Newington Butts
London.

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Geo Cumberland – Richard Cumberland
20th December 1791

Dear Brother, —————————————————————————————————————————————–. James Man is (?building?) a cottage, Harry [Man] building a house, J Humphrey almost finished one on Clapham Common that will stand him in 200 a year. These men get money a little faster than they can get out of it and never think of easing days. My mother is well —————————————————————————————.

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John Man – Richard Cumberland

November 22nd 1792

Dear Sir

your letter has relieved us from some anxiety on account of Maria who we were fearful was ill as it seems really was the case but hope as it is only an eruption on the skin it will go off soon. We do not remember her being so before but as the scurvy is hereditary in the family it may possibly be it in which case I think nothing can be done except as alternatives which I have no occasion to point out to you should she be worse you would be kind enough to favour me with a line or should you not have occasion to come this way before Xmas perhaps she may be trusted by the coach to Henley where I could meet her with a Chaise. I hope your family are all well – my little relation I have not seen yet since she has done us the honour of coming in to the family. I suppose she begins now to be good company for you and I hope will make you both happy for a century to come you see I am very countiful in my wishes but having nothing better to give you I would really bestow that and more too was it in the power of your affectionate cousin Jno Man. My best thanks to Mrs C for her goodness to my Dear Girl. This in same letter in Centre fold. My dear girl, After waiting so long with anxious expectation of seeing you we are greatly disappointed in hearing you have been ill. Be careful and I dare say you will soon be well again and then give me a letter and be sure let me know when you return again. Your mother and myself are both well and so are your brothers which is the best news I have to send you. You will find some alterations among us when you return. Mrs H is married to the (?old?) bricklayer so you have lost a friend. We have (?—–?) every room in the house and were at last obliged to put your cousins in to your bed but you shall have it again. Besides filling the house your mother has filled the yard with Fowls so you will have some amusement among us if it is only the noise of the boys and the squeaking of the chickens. God bless you. I don’t tell you to be good and grateful to your friends for their indulgence to you because I know you have too much sense to be otherwise. Write soon and believe me your most affectionate father.

John Man

Novr 22. 92

Addressed to Rev Mr Cumberland
Driffield
Nr Cirencester
Gloucestershire

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John Man – George Cumberland

June 1st 1796

Dear George,

I have just received your bills which meet my own ideas. Tis thus we judge at all times and on all occasion but I trust I do not flatter you on this. Those to Mr Page are sent off, the rest I have given to the committee to be distributed. I am glad you printed them for our committee is so small and so busy looking after and sending off voters they have no time to this of the (?tress?). I shall be very happy to go with you on Monday but I am so anxious in the cause that had rather you bring the freeholder from your park where perhaps they cannot procure carriages so well as here. At all events unless sent for I shall not go till I see you. If I can procure a return of the Poll this evening will send it.

Yrs

John Man

June 1st 1796

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John Man – George Cumberland

September 18th 1796

Dear George,

Enclosed you have the books you desire to be sent back by which you will see how few Artists of Men of Taste are among us. I have sent over one copy of the Advertisements to each of the Library. After seeing how you catalogue of your works and well I am no longer wondering that I have not seen you here. I wish you could give me a little of that rage for writing you seem to possess for good I faith I hardly know how to pass the day after day in idleness without that enwe so destructive of Englishmen. I hate the coach, have no horse and your house is too far to walk which is the reason I have not eat fruit with you this summer. But if you cannot possibly spare the time to come here and are inclined to meet me half way I am your man. But then it must be not at Oakingham if you wish to enquire of any anecdotes of Pope. Perhaps the Stag and Hounds at Binfield will be the best rendezvous though it adds two miles to my walk because within 2 300 yards from the house is a clump of Beech Trees called Popes Wood in the midst of which was a tree with a seat where he perhaps wrote his Windsor Forest it being a favourite spot where he spent many hours. The tree is decayed but on the nearest to it is cut “By order of the Lady HERE POE SUNG”. I was there lately and found the wood so far decay’d that like time they will soon be no more. I have frequently enquired with the inhabitants for anecdotes but could get none. The rich families of his time are dead or left the place and the poor ones would not have known such a man once lived amongst them but for the enquiries of strangers about him. I met a few days ago by accident a very old man who said he knew him well but could give no more information about him more than is known already except that he was very reserved in company and spoke little. Here are two of his relations who had mourning rings left them but whether they can give any information about him I don’t know. We’ll enquire when you come. Fix a day / or our meeting and let it be a fine one. Harry has completed your order quick in stile of a tradesman you’ll say by exceeding it the truth is we dare not have a 1 gallon keg in the house and to send 4 gills in a five gallon cask would be the sure means of spoiling it and there are no sizes between 2 & 5 gallon so you have 7 gallon in all. I beg my best respects to Mrs Cumberland & family in from your sincerely affectionate friend

John Man

Sept 18th 1796

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James Man – George Cumberland

2nd March 1782

Dear Sir,

I consider myself obliged by your favour of 16th ultimo and agreeable to your desire you will receive by masters waggon which left town from the George Inn on Saturday last 2 hampers containing 2 dozen sherry 3 gallons Brandy as also in a case cask the 10 gallons Rum fil’d for your brother in August last. Not having the mans charge for the iron bound base and being particularly hurried in business must beg you to excuse my not enclosing your bill of parcels of the same which shall be forwarded by another opportunity. These goods I wish safe to hand, that they will prove good in quality I have no doubts. My mother and wife join in love to you and my aunt, believe me Yours affectionately in haste

James Man.

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James Man – George Cumberland

London 7th September 1790

In some time since received a letter from Mr Panton of Leghorn enclosing Bill Lading on your account of 6 package conss. Sundries Shipped in the Sisters —————————————————————– bound for this port effects of late Aunt were seized as India prohibited goods.

I am sir yours

James Man

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George Cumberland – Rev Mr Cumberland

10th October 1790

—————————————————————————————————————– I have wrote to Mr Mann to explain how it happened that I forgot to leave my precise address when leaving town but it is mortifying to be obliged to explain to such a mere merchant so trivial a neglect!

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James Man – George Cumberland

[This a rough transcription – a revised version will be forthcoming]

Replying to an enquiry, James is chasing a bankrupt merchant in Bristol named Harris. He speaks of “attacks” on his health at Driffield dreadfully severe caused big problem.  This is a long letter which goes on & on & on James is staying at: Walter Morrice Esq
Eling Near Southampton. It ends

“I am sir yours most faithfully James Man”

Addressed to Geo Cumberland
Culver Street
Bristol.

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William Man to George Cumberland.

Reading, April 10th1824

Dear Sir

I am sure you will be much grieved to learn of the death of my poor father, who this morning expired after a protracted illness, in great measure occasioned by that most distressing of maladies, the stone, and which he was able to bear up against with a tolerable degree of fortitude to the last moments of his life. The asthma which so much affected him in an early stage of the illness, and which you will recollect, so distressed him when you were last with us, had for some considerable time left him and his general good state of health did not seem to have been in the least impaired by it. Indeed his constitution was so strong as to let him exist a whole fortnight without taking the least sustenance except his medicines, which I understand are soporifics and of which during the last few days of his life he was deprived, not being able to swallow them. My sister who is almost worn out by her increasing attentions to him, and for whose health I have much anxiety joins with me in kind love to yourself and family. I remain dear sir,

Yours,

Wm. Man.

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Richard Cumberland to George Cumberland

May 3rd 1824

This letter is mostly Cumberland chit chat but Richard talks of, “Going to Reading to see poor Maria after the loss of father … and to do something for his poor blind sister as you suggested I may once more see her.”

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John Man to George Cumberland

Thursday morning

Dear George,

You were in such a hurry to set off that I only wonder you had not left more behind than your razors. Your brother however did not come on Tuesday as expected so that had you delayed your departure that day you would not have seen him. Yesterday, when no longer expected they came on us by surprise, both fatigued with the journey but this morning they are very well. I wish anything I say could be of service to Sidney. I had before your note came spoke highly of him and shall do all I can while I can while they stay to promote your wishes. Believe me my dear George, in haste Your affectionate cousin

John Man

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John Man to George Cumberland

Dear George,

Though I am most sorry for the accident you met with and the disappointment I met with in not seeing you on Sunday, yet for the soul of me I could not help laughing at the description you give of such a succession of accidents had Lovedon bricked up your house to prevent your coming it could not have been done more effectively. However we had our revenge for he gave it up yesterday and expresses are sent round to prevent further expense. Mr Dundas is expected here today or tomorrow when I will give him your letter at present we know not where to find him. Give my duty to your Mother & c & c the coach is going and I must conclude in haste yours & c

John Man

Tuesday morning

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John Man to George Cumberland

Dear George,

My friend Williams going by your door gives me the opportunity of returning your book without charge. I thank you for the use of them as I shall for any others you can send me. In these times of distress we want something to keep the mind from despair. What a blessed state the emperors (sic) in and what a blessed state this country is like to be in soon. I think the world is turned upside down if so the heaven born minister is in his right place. I shall be glad to hear how you all are and what you do with yourself and what you do with your Chaise. If repaired I shall expect to see you soon that is to say during the little warm weather we are likely to have this summer. I wonder does not the great expenditure on gun powder at this time in Germany in some measure amount for the coldness of the season. My love and best wishes attend you all Yours sincerely and affectionately

John Man

Saturday morning

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Henry Man to George Cumberland

London 1 March 1813

Dear Cousin,

It is long since we had the pleasure of hearing from you. Your last letter of November date brought to town by your daughter Georgiana came safely to hand but she did not favour us with a call and not knowing where to find her in London we had not the pleasure of seeing her. The Spring now advancing well again make it necessary that one or two other of them will again visit this metropolis do pray remember us kindly to them and say that we shall be extremely happy to see them when they come and have a spare bed well aired and very much at their service it would give both Mrs M and myself great satisfaction to see them with us and make them as comfortable as we can and trust they will never again come to London without affording us the pleasure. It is long since we have heard anything from our young friends George and Sydney. They must already have seen a great variety of service and I hope will continue to do so well. I suppose Sydney saw Madrid but that was all. Your conjecture that we should not be driven out till the spring was wrong as to know for we were not allowed to remain there so long I wish the British were all safe home again. Pray say to Mrs Cumberland that if she would accompany her daughters to London when they next come and make our home her house it would give us great pleasure. Our best endeavours should be exerted to make her comfortable and welcome. I suppose Sydney’s note was irrevocably lost and the rascal who stole it makes it his own. The public papers furnish you with all the political news of the day but such a winter as the past assure Bonaparte and his army never experienced before. The late election campaign at Weymouth proved rather unfortunate in its results to your friend Long. That is according to their ??? report of the examination of the evidence but while the present state of representation prevails such things must be a matter of course . Harriet unites with me in kind remembrances to your family and I remain dear cousin

Yours affectionately

Henry Man

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James Man to  George Cumberland

Woodville
28th May 1823

My dear Sir,

It is time I replied to your favour of 7th inst. yet I cannot bring my mind to coincide with my inclination as to the propriety of being more explicit by letter than I have been not for a moment however doubting your honour or secrecy yet prudence does not seem to warrant it. On the whole it will be not long while ere I return Eastward when making Bristol in my way I will take my chance once more for a private interview. In the meantime let us hope that nothing serious as to the health of our friend will occur at Driffield. You must have mistaken me in supposing I called on you to induce your brother to make his will instead of persuading you to the measure I only asked the question what is to be done? in the hope you would help me to an argument putting the

    need

in another shape (and no man more equal to it) new to me which I might use in a letter to him with a possibility of accomplishing the desired result. I should not hesitate a moment in making use of it and should rejoice if it lended to your interest and his peace of mind. One of his objections is the lawyers. He will have nothing to do with them. To contest this I have recommended he spreads before him the will of Robt. Timbrell following the routine of this he could make his own in privacy. But all hitherto to no avail. In the private conversation you mention as having had with Mrs Cumberland pardon me for saying you must have mistook her meaning you are labouring under a false impression as regards this lady. A more amicable woman does not live nor one so friendly towards you. I know her sentiments and her object in application to you what sordid motive could she have for self she does not possess in her own right an income of more than 2,000 and this for life besides her marriage settlement? But on your declining to act and answering NO she then said, “a certain person would have all”. True, this she wishes not to be the fact but wanting nothing herself her wish was and is that you alone should share in the much wished for measure. Allow me to add, you have been wrong throughout in the conceptions hitherto and I wish I could induce you to think more favourably of Mrs C. She is entitled to your love and affection. This is a charming place, views delightful pleasant walks yet town like hills do not quite suit the limbs of three score and ten. I take your advice and decline going to sea but I have spent a pleasant on board Capt. Lockyer’s yacht in the harbour. My friends are kind, very kind but they keep too much company for me and this neither suits my age, health or inclination so that I must cut and run or die as will I fear your brother of sepletion. I beg my comp to Mrs C and believe me ever

Yours Truly and faithfully

James Man

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James Man to George Cumberland

Woodville 5th May 1823

My Dear Cousin,

I am very much disappointed in not having the pleasure of meeting with you when at Bristol. I came hence that road on purpose to have a private and close conversation. I apprehend that there may be a mischief in a correspondence by letter and this fear makes our ill luck in not meeting the greater. The confidence that has been placed in one by your brother and his wife has so identified me with their concerns and so devoted me to their interests that in gratitude have been induced to act to the best of my ability in arranging such concerns this has led me to the perfect knowledge of the properties of both but this is not the immediate object of this address to you. Guided by these discoveries and alarmed at passing events around me I saw it was of the utmost importance that your brother should make his will and I did not leave him without pointing out in as strong language as I was master of the immediate need of doing so and the serious consequences of delay, but all without avail. He is far; very far from well and to you I need not add the lamentable result of his dying intestate. I am in possession of his intense confidence know all, know too his intentions. A honourable feeling precludes me from saying all I wish yet after mature deliberations I have decided on writing to you, for alas seeing nothing but danger I had almost said ??? in prospect it is time to appraise you and to ask what is to be done. A better more worthy man does not exist but his eccentricities, his singular habits and years precludes the approach of his friends on this

    now

most vital subject once more, then what is to be done. I have no personal interest in this measure, nothing wanting of him by one in a pecuniary sense and so I have told him but I am anxious that a deed should be done so that his intentions may be placed without the possibility of risk. I cannot be more explicit in this way your judgement must supply the rest all indeed that attach to the subject. Did you receive my note from the Bush? Did you go to Driffield? Or are you now there? How did you find / if so and how did you leave your brother? Do favour me by a reply to this and tell me what you think of his disease and I am alarmed for him in every way the prospect is serious. I beg my comp. To Mrs C with thanks for her kind invitation to one the short time I stayed in Bristol I was unwell and obliged to get on RDC. Keep one a month beyond the time I had promised and expected by my friends here. This is a delightful and I do think I may safely challenge all England to produce any situation equal to the two here Woodville v The Moate.

God preserve you.

I am my dear sir yours most faithfully

James Man

At James Yates Esq.
Woodville
Kingsbridge
Devon

This must be considered a confidential letter, better you burn it.

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John Man to George Cumberland

Dear Cousin,

I have stolen an hour from my bed this morning, it being my only leisure time. I have to write a few lines by way of answer to your last kind letter the modesty of which I cannot but greatly admire. That we are both equally guilty I grant and therefore shall offer no excuses for a fault my heart stand self condemned off. You my dear cousin first found the means to break this silence which has long reigned between us. I thank you and hope I never be behind in acknowledging the honour you have thereby done me by answering whatever letters you may favour me with in future with the first opportunity I would say something more substantial but know not what. Now I have none, nor anything worth entertaining you with at present and I am not fond of writing to my friend at the sole expense of a weak head the sole productions of which will never find credit with the sensible part of mankind and this among others may be one reason I did not write before. I wish you were here to dictate a few lines for me for really I am ashamed for what I have already written and between friends it has been twice under condemnation already. But I being a merciful man like certain great persons at St James’ have given it a reprieve. You wonder that you have not seen my mother yet, so do I, yet cannot account for it for I have not heard from her since Whitsuntide. If you hear any news of her be kind enough to let me know, and send me all the news you can of our Right Honourable Aunt Nancy dear creature. How good she is how mild, so courteous she is the very life and soul of all company, and at kicking up a riot there’s not a fellow in all St Giles’s at Whitechapel. Mr Tapp no doubt is very proud of the honour she does him now and then, to be sure as she once said everybody loves her. I’m not sure you and I do, but enough of this, I wish as I said before I had anything better to write about but at present you will excuse it. We have had so far a fine a harvest in these parts that the farmers themselves complain; nay I verily believe if their skin was not so very thick they blush when they tell us bread will be no cheaper. The dog you sent me was yesterday drowned, Mrs Baker took it in her head because the dog was not well, she must be going mad so I gave my consent that I might not disturb the happening of the best of Mistresses. You see what trifles I write about but it’s for want of something better so I hope you will excuse it. Oh, here’s Martha (The Goddess) who reigns over our pots and saucepans she has brought me my half pint of milk so I’ll drink your health and then conclude with duty to my Aunt and love to Cousin. Your affectionate cousin, I’m ashamed to say,

John Man

I’ll not read it over but if you have patience to read it thus far let me desire you commit it adflammas.

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James Man to George Cumberland

I wanted you to have gone with one Dr Cross. My dear Coz Make my best respects to Mrs Cumberland with thanks for the invitation to tea and offer of a bed. The first I was taking when the note arrived the second I have ordered, I am an invalid and must be off early in the morning or would have done myself the pleasure of calling at you house. I regret much my disappointment at not seeing you, a close private communication is lost but we must submit to our fate. Your brother set out with me for Bristol and sundries for that journey provided you were to return with him to Driffield. On our way we called on the Jones’s there he changed his mind and returned home you and I know him and I should think little of this but he is really unwell. I have now stated the fact and you will act as you see best but I really submit the wisdom of your going over there. I am not the bearer of more than his love to you and to state

    that ill health

alone induced to give up the journey yet a visit I think he will take kind. God Bless you ever faithfully

James Man

Bush 7 o’clock

ADD 36516 f 184
James Man to George Cumberland

53 Bush Inn
12 Street 4 o’clock

My dear sir

I have made this in my way to Devon on purpose that I might have half an hour’s private chat with you. I trust this will reach you in health and at home and that you will follow this bearer to my Dr Sir James Man I left Driffield yesterday, Ealing Green this morning I

    must

see you it is not possible to see you this trip bad ????? excellent there Culver Steet.

ADD 36502 f 262
Henry Man to George Cumberland
London 8th August 1810

Dear Cousin

Your parcel which should have reached me on Sunday has but this moment come to hand 5 o’clock owing to it being improperly addressed to Botolph Lane instead of St Mary’s Hill. Lest you should think me inattentive I wrote by this evening’s post and will in my way home call at Sydney’s lodgings whom I make little doubt has gone on an excursion with his friend Stothard as when I last saw him he told me he should. We expected to have seen him on Sunday last to dinner but the weather proving so unfavourable, or perhaps he was not returned is the reason why he did not come. However I hope before you receive this all your apprehensions will be at rest by a letter from him. If you hear not from me by tomorrow’s post you may conclude that my enquiries this evening have proved satisfactory and that he is well. Mrs M I am sorry to say is again confined for the sixth time with a miscarriage but is going on as well as we can reasonably expect. Pray remember me kindly to Mrs Cumberland and believe me to be dear cousin ever yours most faithfully

Henry Man
1 St Mary Hill not 39 Botolph Lane which I left seven years ago. On the back of the original manuscript is quite a bit of text, which I can make no sense of. SM 28.12.00

ADD 36502 f 246
Henry Man to George Cumberland

London 26th July 1810

Dear Cousin,

Yours of the 10th and 18th are just before me and in reply I have the pleasure to add that Sydney was with us last night and I went with him to a Widow lady’s in our neighbourhood with whom we have agreed and keeping your instruction in view I hope the terms will meet with your approval. To have a good bedroom to himself ready furnished but his own furniture is to be taken in and left in the room till otherwise disposed of. To breakfast at eight, dine at five, drink tea and sup with the family consisting of a widow and her daughter, in a good plain but comfortable family way, to pay for washing of towels and bed linen extra but for the board and lodging twenty five shillings per week without any other charge tea and sugar to be provided for him. The lady herself as far as one can judge from first sight seems to be a respectable, good sort of person about 50 years of age and rather inclined to the ??????? and give most reputable references as to character and connections. Her daughter I did not see. Sydney seems to be a very well disposed and good lad and both Mrs Man and myself will be always happy to have him to dine with us every Sunday when he is not better engaged and we will endeavour to make his Winter evenings as comfortable as we can while he continues in our neighbourhood. Today he is to meet with his present landlady about leaving to lodgings and if she will let him go immediately he intends taking up his new residence at Kennington Lane on Saturday night. My father has been with me in town for a few days and unites with Mrs Man and myself in kind remembrance to all your house. He does not expect to visit Gloucestershire this summer. I wish your letter had arrived a few days sooner as I went to Maidstone last week and could have enquired about the books you speak of, however I will bear them in mind. My Mrs Man is very unwell nor do see much prospect of her enjoying better health for some time. In haste believe me dear cousin yours most truly

Henry Man to George Cumebrland
Add 36502 f198

London 23rd March 1810

Dear Cousin It is long since your son delivered to me your very kind letter of 15th December last which I am ashamed to add has remained so long unanswered which would have not have been the case would he have favoured us with his company a little more frequently. Indeed we do not see him half so often as both Mrs M and myself wish. He was coming over to dine with us last Sunday but meeting Mr E Man near Westminster Bridge who informed him of my wife’s unfortunate miscarriage the preceding evening deterred him from coming over. I however should have been very happy to have seen him, and with the opportunity of forwarding him this for you. I have written to invite him for Sunday week when I hope Mrs Man will be able to be again below stairs. She is yet very weak but I think her as well as I have a right to expect. Your brother when he was lately in town paid me for the Brandy I sent to Bristol and I gave him a receipt for it as you requested. I hope your family continue to enjoy the same good state of health as when you wrote, to all of whom we beg to be kindly remembered. My father family at Reading, on your conjecture, go on much as usual. He is again at present engaged with bricks and mortar building himself a small house in Castle Street to retire to and calculates on getting it sufficiently forward to be inhabited at Michaelmas, where I am sure he would be extremely happy to see you when you next travel this way. It will I am sure give you pleasure to hear, if you have not already heard, that a complete reconciliation has taken place between my wife and her relations. We all dined with them on New Years Day and I am happy in adding that we continue our best possible feelings with them by interchanging of visits and antics. The fine weather coming on with long days and your son being settled in town will, I hope be an inducement to you to turn your thoughts this way. We shall be very happy to see you and Mrs Man can give you a spare bed.

I remain dear cousin yours most truly

Henry Man
ADD 36501 f 203

Henry Man to George Cumberland

London 8th April 1808

My Dear Cousin

I have long been a letter in your debt for your very kind and polite congratulations on my recent marriage, which I should have replied to in course but waited the opportunity of a friend going to Bristol to send it by. In circumstances having occurred to make his journey unnecessary I shall call on my friend Mr Lefevre for a frank if he is in town which will answer the purpose full as well and I hope you will receive it safe. I thank both you and Mrs Cumberland for her kind wishes towards us and I have pleasure in adding that I enjoy all the happiness you promised in a former letter. I am as comfortable a heart can wish. My dear Harriet begs me to say that she would be exceeding happy to see you and Mrs Cumberland at No 20 Chester Place Kennington where she has a spare bed always at your service, I need not add how much pleasure it would give me. Your brother Mr R Cumberland gave us his company one-day when he was last in town. I think he looked remarkably well. If you see him pray remember me kindly to him and also to all your family in which Mrs Man begs to join. I am my dear cousin ever yours most truly

Henry Man
1 St Mary Hill

ADD 36499 f 265
Henry Man to George Cumberland

London 5th October 1803

Dear Cousin,

I should have replied to your favour earlier, but being obliged to write to Reading for the particulars of the account you mention I waited for my brother’s reply and send you the bill annexed. It does not belong to me but is a claim of my brother William’s who succeeded me in business, but as we have an account open with each other if you remit me the amount it shall be regularly be passed to his and to your credit. With pleasure I shall execute for you any commissions you may have in London whether now or at any future day and if you will favour me with the particulars of those little accounts which wish settled here you may rely on their being regularly attended to as soon as I receive it I entirely agree with you in your remarks on my late uncle’s works and the only circumstance to be urged in justification of the intrusion of so many of his most trifling pieces is a very great want of matter to complete the volumes. The generosity of readers you know are not judges for their subscription something was expected and if we had not had recourses to their trifling materials which we found scattered in a variety of places we should not have been able to make up two volumes as we did. At all events it was a means of stopping one plan of complaint. My brother says your books shall be immediately packed and forwarded as you direct and James’s desire to return my fathers thanks for the perusal of them which offered him much pleasure. He begs his kind remembrances to Mrs C, yourself and family of all ours and in which request I must beg leave to join. Our commerce here most completely at a stand this cursed war dreadfully unhinges us and little else is talked of but invasion and stoppages. How it is to end God only knows. Last week one of the first houses in the city failed and this day rumour says another is gone. I heard from your brother yesterday and I am happy to hear his family are all well. With respectful compliments I remain dear cousin yours most truly

Henry Man

P.S. I am removed from Botolph Lane to Harp Lane Tower Street where I must thank you to address me in future.

ADD 36499 f 255
John Man to George Cumberland

Dear George

I received an anonymous note by a bargeman requesting to inform you when your packages would be at Bristol. I have enquired at the wharf bur as the proprietor of the boats lives at Newbury they cannot here inform me when you would receive them. I saw one large packing case, one long box, a chair and bookbinder cutting machine and understood they sailed for Newbury as today and that you might expect them by the end of next week. If any further delay is made you will apply to Moss Barnard & White barge owners Newbury in whose care they now are. A friend of yours called on me some time ago and left word he should breakfast at the Crown whether as soon as I could write a note and enclose it in the diversions I dispatched both by my servant, who on returning said the gentleman had been gone some time. The book shall be taken care of till I can deliver it to you safe. I hope your little family are all well and that little Noah’s Ark you may at length become steadfast, there are no mountains in England high enough to reach you but in Wales wither I suppose you are going you may find one to suit you. My direction is so imperfect that I am doubtful whether this will ever reach you. The only way for one to know that will be you writing me when, where and how you intend to settle and make your residence but perhaps you will first see London and if so I think you ought to at least pass one night with me in your way. Think of that George I have not seen the Parson heaven bless him for an age but in my minds eye I can fancy him full of business plowing, sowing, reaping, lithing, cramming Capons and culling shore pigs the fruits of all this will be care. Distrust any rely trouble and perplexity were to bestow his gains, in the country there are rogues, in the town thieves, public funds totter and banks are not to be trusted, better, far better dear Richard would you be if your canvas bag like mine was just sufficient for the wants of the year and no more. You promised to send me some of your actual and intended publications but behold I have received neither and being too modest to put you in mind of it I suppose I must forego the pleasure they would afford me till you recollect the circumstance. I am Dear George your affectionate friend

John Man.

Sept 22nd 1803

Addressed to George Cumberland Esq
Mr Bonnings
High St
Bristol.

ADD 36498 f 368
John Man to George Cumberland

Dear George

I return you your good wished to myself and my family three times fold because not withstanding your rebellious spirit I know you deserve them and would do the same by your caring nature but that it has been done long ago. That was sent you with the other books and if you have not lent it again to somebody and forgot it (no very wonderful thing you know) it must be in your possession. I assure you I only borrow books to read and when that is done I return them as I hope you will find when the next day gives you leisure to search for it. Harry cannot send you the Brandy for the best of all reasons, he has none. Some has been lying at the Wharf in London for him ever since November and not a barge has been able to stir since for either flood or frost and the present rain seems to threaten a further delay. If he receives it within the course of the next week it shall be sent to you immediately. I hope your wine will be able to brook this delay but should it be in danger of spoiling before that time don’t wait for him a day. I would not have your best beverage spoiled for a compliment. If he does not send it next week you may conclude it had not arrived and act accordingly. Dr. Breedon tells me your brother was in town before the holidays but did not call on him nor me. Did he on you? And how is he? My loss you know though I wonder you do not mention it indeed it was a severe one to the family but as having a sufficiency often reconciles us to the loss of our friends so I hope Nellie and the children will soon find them selves in a happier position than they have been. In regard to politics the general apathy that possesses the nation at large has laid hold of me and as the war is to be carried on in perpetuity I am very careless about it. I have been looking out for a little cottage in the country that will just hold a little man, a little woman, and a little friend and when I have obtained it Mr Bill may tax and be damned – he shall not reach me. When the season arrives when asparagus is in fashion and hanging the order of the day I shall expect you here for I begin to suspect nothing but a Sheriff’s mandate will bring you so far from your happy home. My best respects attend all your family. I hope they are increased since I last saw you. Some men build barns for their grain and stalls for their cattle but god will you to be content to add a new wing to your house and in a year or two to accommodate the addition which as a good subject and true mussel man (for I believe you too wise for a Christian) you are bound to make your household.

I am yours

John Man

January 9th 1800

ADD 36503 f 223
Henry Man to George Cumberland

London 21st July 1812

Dear Cousin

The letter I received from you yesterday gave me considerable pain on finding Sydney had so likely incurred your displeasure and in consequence I immediately sent for him to meet me at Chester Place last night. The results of my enquiries I am happy in saying fully satisfied my mind and acquits him of having performed any improper or vicious connections and I trust upon your arrival in town you will be equally satisfied with myself on this lead. I really do believe the very utmost of his misconduct is what is but too common the attendant our youth is a want of sufficiently appreciating the value of money and too profuse an expenditure of it in trifles. The loss of the 20 pound note is an act of abominable carelessness but I hope it will ultimately be recovered as the number is known and it is stopped at the bank. Why Sydney took up his salary at the office before it was due I know not but he got the money of his friend Mr Swann at Cox and Greenwoods for his receipt dated on the quarter day and I am equally satisfied that the young man at the Bricklayers Arms Public House has actually got the note which Sydney gave him by mistake. The very looks of the fellow speak guilt and I hope it will ultimately be recovered. It had not been paid in to the bank on Saturday last when I enquired and it is stopped. Notice will be sent to me immediately on it being presented. You may rely on it and I hope you will believe that though your son may be imprudent he is not vicious and I really do believe him to be a good and worthy young man. He has from both Mrs Man and myself a general invitation to spend as much of his leisure at our home as is agreeable to himself. He dined with us on Sunday last and if we dine at home ourselves we expect him the next and I am sure if we had not so good an opinion of him we should act otherwise. I hope we shall soon see you in town when I doubt of being able to satisfy you on this lead and in the meanwhile pray present my kind compliments to Mrs C and assure her from me she may dissipate her alarms on Sydney’s account. I shall use my best exertion towards recovering the money lost but I am informed that Sydney cannot proceed against the fellow by service for the debts in the present stage of the business. I remain dear sir your most faithfully

Henry Man

ADD 36503 f 247
Henry Man to George Cumberland

London 24th August 1812

Dear Cousin

The annexed letter I received on Saturday from Bridgewater which you perhaps will be able to follow up. Should you want any assistance in London you will not hesitate to employ me and I shall with pleasure follow your instructions. I hope yourself and my friend Sydney arrived safe and well and found all your family so too. Pray remember us kindly to Mrs C and your daughters and should it be in my powers to leave London for a week or ten days together, Mrs M and myself will pay you a visit there. In haste I remain dear cousin yours most faithfully Henry Man HC from Mrs Beavan Attached letter re note in previous letter recovered in Dunster Addressed to Mr Henry Man St Mary Hill in London

ADD 36503 f 226
John Man to George Cumberland

Dear George

I should have answered your letter sooner if I could have given you any useful advice with respect to the best method of disposing of your estate. To advertise seems to be the easiest way though attended with expense but this I suppose will not be very great if it is only done in the country papers. If you wish it to be more universally known I would recommend it to de done by means of periodical publications and the assistance you have so frequently given to the monthly magazine will I should conceive induce the editor to give room for a puff such as you are capable of drawing up in his publication. We have lately had an enclosure in a neighbouring parish where a part was sold to pay for the expense of the Act. It consisted of a large common over grown with fir and was divided in to lots of 10 acres each. Horace attended the sale for a friend and bought 15 lots at around 80 – 90 pounds per acre. Now as you are in the neighbourhood of Axbridge where many people may wish to be accommodated with small quantities, would not this method be the best to be adopted in the shape of the larger ground according to your plan, seems very well adapted such a measure. Fences drawn across it will be all that is required to form the divisions. To prevent impositions from the Auctioneers you might bargain with me by the lump pay your own advertisement yourself and set the lawyers defiance. Some say this is not a time to purchase Estates because stocks are too low to be sold out with advantage, others that it is the best ever offered because people who have money are afraid to place it in funds. Both may be right and both wrong but I have never heard of late years that anyone who had a good thing for sale wanted of a purchaser. Your son Sydney is so modest (I wonder where the devil he got that same modesty) that prevail with him to stop even to dine with us but I hope he has now found his way through Reading. He will never pass my door without calling nor any of my Bath and Bristol cousins who I shall always be happy to see and have a bed at their service. Whether it is decided by fate that I shall ever again see Bristol is more than I know but I think of it and often talk of it but like most old men have not resolution to gratify my own wishes at the expense of a little resolution but whatever may happen I know you cannot get to the great city without passing my door I flatter myself we may still see you. With my good wishes to yourself and family I remain yours affectionately

John Man

ADD 36506 f 148
John Man to George Cumberland

Dear George

I should have noticed your kind consolatory letter sooner if the afflicted state of my mind would have permitted it and even now it is with pain that I revert to a subject that I could wish to keep from my recollections. To be plunged in an instant into the greatest of calamities that could almost be inflicted by heaven or supported by a parent is more than I am able to bear. His loss is too deeply impressed on my mind ever to be forgot and though I may vegetate (not live) for a few weeks, months or years longer my whole existence must be spent in mournful recollections of the past. I have exhausted Pandora’s box but hope likewise was fled from it may you never experience such an affliction the severity of which can only be felt by those who like me have been a victim. For the last two years I have been harassed by an unfortunate business that had previously to this robbed me of a great part of my former felicity. Some years back myself and my dear boy so serve one of the family entered in to a joint bond for the security of the payment of 1000.00 pounds borrowed for his use. This money was called in about this time but the principal not being able to pay more than 250.00 of it the remainder with interest fell upon us, which we have been paying by instalments but the whole is not yet cleared. The result has been that from being before in comfortable circumstances I have been reduced to the greatest privations. This has obliged me to continue in a fatiguing office above my strengths for the sake of a small pecuniary salary. Judge then if I can under these circumstances accept your brother’s kind invitation now especially as I am not allowed to leave home a week at a time. These things prevent me giving you a meeting at Driffield, which of all things I should wish and my daughter Is very desirous of. God only knows if it can ever take place but this ought not to prevent your calling on me on your way to town. I expected you last time on your way back as you promised, but I need not tell you I was disappointed however I hope you will now call more frequently as I am now almost estranged from human society and your company would give me pleasure. I think you are right respecting the character of the lady you mention, excepting her vulgarity but perhaps as I am not much acquainted with persons in genteel life I may have mistaken it for ease of manners. Her other characteristicks (sic) are too strong not to be mistaken and her designs pretty apparent, but unless you can undeceive in respect to her artful ways and the hold she has on Susan’s affections I fear mischief may ensue to the family. To talk of undermining a lady may be thought too indelicate and to blow her up as bad but the terms are very significant and may be practised with success. I am dear George your very affectionate cousin

John Man

October 17th 1817

ADD 36506 f 65
Henry Man to George Cumberland

London 5th April 1817

Dear Cousin

Knowing your readiness to serve anyone when it pays in your favour I hesitate not to trouble you on the present occasion. The case is simply this, I have just heard that the Governor of the penitentiary is about to resign his situation, in short he cannot hold it any longer and my friend Mr Lefevre (who is one of the committee) has advised me to become a candidate for it considering me a fit and proper person for the appointment. It is scarcely necessary to add that he will render me all the assistance in his power both by his vote and ??? but there a four gentlemen of the committee, mostly Members of Parliament. He wishes me to make all the possible interest I can with my other friends. In this view I look to you as one of the foremost of the members and though I am sensible I ought not to trouble on the subject yet as I have no other channel through which I can possibly get at one gentleman of the committee. I trust the necessity of the case will plead my excuse. That gentleman is Mr Long; he takes an active and leading part and could that obtain his interest alone would be a host to me. Lord Sidmouth in the former appointment claimed the nomination but he leaves it wholly to the committee in this instance either directly or indirectly. I should therefore feel particularly obliged if you could write to that gentleman in my favour. The qualifications are I understand that the party must be a married man and a member of the C of E and otherwise qualified in accounts, diligence in attendance to business, regular habits of living, and in all these I flatter myself I should not be found deficient. Sydney tells me you are expected in town very soon and I should have waited your arrival but that promptness of measures are very requisite as I have heard of other candidates having started and it is always in these cases that the foremost have the best chances. The situation is good and will be better. Trade is very bad and if I could but get the situation I could enter on it at three days notice. My friends in town will do all for me they can but without your interest we cannot get at Mr Long. I regret extremely to obliged to trouble you on this occasion but without your assistance I shall be foiled in that quarter. With kind remembrances to Mrs Cumberland and my cousins I am dear Sir in haste yours very truly

Henry Man

Addressed to George Cumberland Culver Street Bristol Post Script illegible.

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